Wasted Efforts

That thing that you do for me

without me

you do

to me 

Jeffrey Brown quoted this during his TED Talk regarding what he learned as a pastor in Boston’s inner city. He realized that listening was more valuable than preaching, that partnering was more important than plotting, and that seeing was more important than fixing. He had spent years trying to “fix” the drug dealers and gang members before he took the time to know them. The “miracle” of his revelation led to an 79% decrease in crime in Boston.

I can use this info when I think I can fix somebody or preach them into my agenda.

Rev. Jeffrey Brown speaks at TED2015 - Truth and Dare, Session 9, March 16-20, 2015, Vancouver Convention Center, Vancouver, Canada. Photo: Bret Hartman/TED

Rev. Jeffrey Brown speaks at TED2015 – Truth and Dare, Session 9, March 16-20, 2015, Vancouver Convention Center, Vancouver, Canada. Photo: Bret Hartman/TED

6 thoughts on “Wasted Efforts

  1. I get where he is coming from and I agree. However, let me spin this. Sometimes what we do for others without them even knowing has a positive, profound and lasting affect/effect. Think about all of the prayers we send up to heaven on behalf of those who we don’t even know.

    • JuJu,
      Valid point. I too thought first of that when I heard this quote. Obviously, we must keep sending blessings out into the lives of others.

      Maybe how the quote can be taken is…without real seeing and real loving and real partnering, real praying is not possible.

      • “…without real seeing and real loving and real partnering, real praying is not possible.”

        Best quote! You should steal that from yourself and run with it. I see a post in the near future from that.

        Let’s get Velveteen Rabbit Real!

      • You’re right. I feel a blog coming. haha
        But, it is so true. Often we mistake our whining about getting our own way for “prayer”

  2. I love this! I feel like I can apply this to my job, actually. We talk with people, offering guidance. But sometimes we make the mistake of talking and advising before actually listening. This can very often result in mistakes that we have to fix later down the road. Thanks for sharing!

  3. I make that mistake way too often, too.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s