The Whole World at Our Disposal?

It sounds bizarre to believe the whole world belongs to us when we feel (and most likely have experienced) quite the opposite: poor, helpless, and abandoned.

But, I am starting to understand why it might be true.

Just the other day, while working on a discouraging project, I decided to exchange an attitude of scarcity and defeat for an attitude of hope. It took a day or two, but, I began to…

  • attract abundance from “nowhere”
  • have new ideas
  • feel joy and energy to take steps forward
  • be an encouragement instead of a drain to others around me

To know nothing is lacking is to agree with the same abundant Universe that has remarkably sustained me until now.

Why Humility Equals Wisdom

This quote seems a bit radical, but after reflecting on it, I found reason to believe it.

Humility equals wisdom because it allows us to:

  • discover wisdom well beyond our own personal limitations
  • acknowledge that we don’t know as much as we think we know
  • appreciate mystery
  • listen better
  • surrender our illusion of being wise

T. S. Eliot was a pretty smart guy. Mostly because he was a humble inquirer.

Just Sing

People are a mess. Life is often a mess. Things happen. Death is inevitable.

But, sing anyway.

Look it square in the face and sing.

That may sound absurd, but when I do, I find courage. Sometimes, even a smile.

 

Music seems to connect me to a harmony above the chaos.

That’s a good reason to test the hypothesis, anyway. (Especially when we consider how important music has been in all the stages of our life, how imbedded it is in our memories, and how much music meddles with our emotions.)

How Do I Make Sense of This?

When my challenged nephew struggles against the yoke of his physical and mental challenges, there seems to be no relief. As his caregiver, I often want to despair.

I again find myself in the dark cavern of tragedy struggling to fathom the why of the world’s suffering.

Then, this simplest of truths:

Whatever is happening is the path to enlightenment. 

If I surrender, all the distasteful and the unwanted will explain the riddles of life to me.


When I get this, life shifts from meaningless trouble to special-ops training.

Come to me all who are weary and heavy-laden and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am meek and lowly of heart.

My yoke is easy and my burden is light.

Will You Run Away?

 

“The chances that you will wake up are in direct proportion to the amount of truth you can take without running away.” – Anthony De Mello

Running away is often my modus operandi when I don’t agree with someone.

But, it has been very easy for me to talk about how others are blind and clueless about their own choices.

Cringing at the times in my past when I said and did stupid things (that I thought were smart), alerts me that these lapses in judgment are still happening. 

So, I must learn how to:

  • ask for help; listen instead of talk
  • believe it when people tell me how I can improve
  • quit justifying myself
  • keep reading
  • keep seeking other perspectives
  • accept criticism without running from the discomfort

How Our Daily Life Is Like TV News

Everyone is critical of how negative and inefficient TV news is, but most of us…

  • spend the majority of our conscious hours focused on what’s going wrong in the world rather than what’s going right
  • have too many “commercial” breaks for shameless self-promotion or ego-driven side lines
  • are more show than substance

It is no accident TV news became what it is. It’s driven by human nature.

If we want something more, we must become something more. More noble. More courageous. More grateful.

That’s the Way I Like It

 

It’s pretty normal to sigh about our workload…or lack of work…or not being able to have what we want…or what went wrong…or the seemingly unfair absence of hope.

But, there is only one way to keep our discouragement from defining us: choose to meditate on the things we have versus the things we don’t have.

Catching myself sighing, getting bored, anxious, or pronouncing judgement on my life is the first step.

The second step is recovering my delight in my heart beat, or oxygen, or the beauty in something that exists in my memory or right now.

Practiced Satisfaction.

Practiced Deep Satisfaction.

So I can smile at the future and be ready for more.

(The essence of the Law of Attraction. Be attractive. Change your vibration. Attract beauty.)

It’s Not Just Them

It is easy to think it is just my opponents who’s minds are being destroyed by greed, hatred, and ignorance. Yet, although uncomfortable to articulate, the three evils lurk within my mind as well. They may show up as subtle thoughts about getting what is due to me, or in an angry unwillingness to listen to another’s opinion, or even in the manner I go after food and drink or luxuries.

But, if I don’t cultivate acute self-awareness and consciously execute offensive attacks to uproot these bad seeds, I am just as prone to succumb to their destructive powers as anyone.

My strongest motivation to ruthlessly search for and weed out these culprits?

The knowledge that we never get away with bad-character decisions.

How I Justified Exaggeration

When telling a story…

  1. It wouldn’t sound interesting enough if I didn’t exaggerate just a little
  2. Otherwise my story wouldn’t get the cred it deserved

When I was a kid…

  1. I didn’t want to get in trouble
  2. I didn’t know how to get attention

When I was hurting…

  1. No one seemed to understand
  2. I didn’t know how to communicate my pain

Finally learning to accept myself with all my flaws, brought…

  • freedom to tell nothing but the truth
  • healthy detachment from how others responded to me
  • new, unaffected ways to describe inner pain, boundaries, and needs

It is also the rule of…

  • relationships that thrive
  • good nights’ sleep
  • uncomplicated lives
  • the best definition of success (even if telling the whole truth gets us in trouble, at least we will have a clear conscience)

Ban Excuses!

Whatever happens, take responsibility…instead of blaming, shaming or making excuses for ourselves and others.

Even if wronged, ask…

  • How do I move forward productively?
  • How do I keep from doing the same to others?
  • Have I ever done the same to others? (Be humble enough to entertain the possibility, keeping in mind that it is easy to forget how we hurt others but difficult to forget how others have hurt us.)
  • Besides my own perspective, what are others’ viewpoints?
  • What can I learn from this experience?
  • How can I avoid wasting my energy on blame and shame?
  • What narrative will I choose about this experience? The narrative of a victim or the narrative of an overcomer?